#TOXINS tweet Book01




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#TOXINS tweet Book01

ISBN:
Paperback: 978-1-61699-066-4 (1-61699-066-X) eBook: 978-1-61699-067-1 (1-61699-067-8)

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#TOXINS tweet Book01
Table of Contents

Section 1: Toxins in Our Home and Outdoor Environments
Section 2: Health Issues Linked to Environmental Exposures
Section 3: Hope for the Future
Section 4: Food and Water
Section 5: Personal Care Products
Section 6: Pregnancies and Small Children
Section 7: Household and Garage
Section 8: Indoor Pollution
Section 9: Outdoor Environments and Garden
Section 10: Pets


 



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With respect to toxins in our air, food or water, the issue is not that we have too little information, but that we have too much. In #TOXINS tweet, expert Dr. Laurel J. Standley tackles this issue head on, by filtering the information out there to bring you the most credible nuggets you need to transform your family’s home into a healthier, safer environment. Organized into discrete sections, by toxin category or source, this book helps you make personal choices on reducing exposure to a wide variety of toxins, ensuring better health for yourself, your family and your planet.


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#TOXINS tweet Book01

140 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Family’s Exposure to Environmental Toxins

by Laurel J. Standley, Ph.D.

What goes around, comes around. This old wisdom holds especially true for new issues–issues related to the quality and sustainability of our lifestyles. While all of us want healthy living for ourselves and our families, the foundation of such a desire is clean air and water and good, wholesome food. Yet the choices we make, whether those choices are related to transportation, nutrition or general consumption, often result in the release of toxins into our atmosphere, water or food chain. As responsible, well-meaning people, how do we understand where these toxins come from and the impact of our personal choices? And what should we do to ensure a healthy home?

The issue is not too little information, but too much. In fact, there is so much research out there on toxins in our food, water, air and homes that one can completely lose track of where to begin and what action to take. Dr. Laurel J. Standley, a leading voice on environmental toxins, understands that the overabundance of information can completely overwhelm even the very intelligent. She wrote#TOXINS tweet to filter the information out there to bring you the most credible nuggets you need to transform your family’s home into a healthier, safer environment.

#TOXINS tweet is organized into clear sections, by toxin category or source. Household cleaners, toxins associated with pet care, in-utero exposure…all these and more are covered in a clear, stepwise manner. In the lucid voice of an expert and in the tweetable format that invites immediate action, #TOXINS tweet helps you make personal choices on reducing exposure to a wide variety of toxins, ensuring better health for yourself, your family and your planet.

#TOXINS tweet is part of the THiNKaha series whose 112-page books contain 140 well-thought-out quotes (tweets/ahas).

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Read about the AHAthat

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Sample Tweets from the Book

#5 Like the tip of an iceberg, that number doesn’t include what we haven’t measured yet or don’t have the tools to measure.

#44 Things can get better; intervention studies are showing health impacts and toxic body burdens can go down if exposures are reduced.

#72 Products used in personal care may present the greatest challenge in switching to safer products because of strong personal preferences.

#123 Location, location, location: air quality where you live can have a major impact on your health; check air quality in your area.

#133 When growing food near old (pre-1980s) homes and in cities, use clean soils added to raised beds; test the soil for lead.

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About the Author

Laurel J. Standley, Ph.D.
Laurel J. Standley, Ph.D.

 

With over two decades of field, research and policy experience on environmental concerns, Dr. Laurel Standley has worked on sustainability issues long before they became issues for most people.

Dr. Standley’s research locations include the Stroud Water Research Center in Avondale, PA, the Silent Spring Institute in Newton, MA, and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy at the University of Delaware. She has a B.S. in Chemistry from California Polytechnic State University, an M.A. in Urban Affairs and Public Policy from the University of Delaware and a Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from Oregon State University. As Principal of Clear Current LLC, she provides cutting edge technical and policy guidance to numerous businesses and government agencies on sustainable water and energy use, water resources, healthy environments and green alternatives in product manufacturing and use. Dr. Standley lives in California.